Unique scottish sea glass jewellery … the perfect gift. Jewelry is a wearable item/gift that is also sentimental: Practically anything can be given as a gift. If it is needed, wanted, or will make someone happy, it is a great gift, whatever it may be. Nevertheless, there is no denying the fact that some gifts are more sentimental than others. There is simply something about jewelry that makes it sentimental. Perhaps it is because some jewelry pieces represent very monumental periods in people’s lives such as engagements, weddings, births and graduations. Regardless, one thing is for certain: jewelry is a wearable item that is not just useful and pretty, but sentimental as well.

Jewelry is appropriate for someone of any age and it’s a lot better than giving a child a set of drums. I promise. Even if they aren’t your child. Retribution exists. You can make never have enough jewelry. Jewelry is a memorable gift. You’ll always remember who gave it to you, what the occasion was, and where you were. Jewelry is meaningful and more than just metal and rocks. Jewelry tells a story; your story. Jewelry is lasting. Jewelry is more than a purchase – it’s an investment that can actually appreciate in value. Plus, most family heirlooms are pieces of jewelry that pass from one generation to the next. You could start a new family tradition. See more details at Sea pottery necklaces.

Sea jewelry terms : Curvature – Usually indicates a piece of sea glass was a production item such as a bottle or jar. Embossing – Embossing was used widely in commercial products before the use of printed labels. Embossing is where the product name and other information is molded with the glass bottle. Other sources of embossed sea glass pieces are window pieces that had texture. Sea glass that has embossing s very desirable and can give a clue to age and origin. Embossing is also used in decorative glass wares.

Scottish jewelry is influenced by viking jewelry so here is a fact about viking jewelry. Viking bead ornaments were typically made of amber or glass and were some of the most common additions on necklaces. In today’s world these items are relatively cheap and widely used, but archeological evidence from Viking grave sites suggests that these ornaments were rare and not worn by many. Moreover, even the Viking ornaments with beads only had one, two, or three of them, either worn alone or with an additional pendant such as Thor’s hammer, Mjolnir. Finding more than three beads on a necklace was extremely rare, which suggests that they were precious and rare, and perhaps symbolized one’s wealth and status in society.

My love of sea glass has progressed to sea pottery which is in abundance on certain East coast beaches of Scotland. There must have been potteries many years ago in the areas surrounding the Firth of Forth and remains thrown into the water. I have found some lovely pieces since I have been looking and often wonder what the piece originally was, where it came from and how long it had been tumbled by the waves. I love how the pottery feels, and some of the shapes are just perfect for making into necklaces. Source: https://alamercreations.com/.

History themed scottish jewelry